The Editor's Blog | Business Facilities - Area Economic Development, Site Selection & Workforce Solutions

New laws and public scrutiny are spurring a wave of relocations for some traditional industries.


https://businessfacilities.com/2014/07/packing-and-leaving/
New laws and public scrutiny are spurring a wave of relocations for some traditional industries.

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The Editor’s Blog

Latest: Packing and Leaving - New laws and public scrutiny are spurring a wave of relocations for some traditional industries.

Packing and Leaving

New laws and public scrutiny are spurring a wave of relocations for some traditional industries.

More Jobs Than Workers

North Dakota is coming up with creative ideas to address its chronic workforce shortage.

Rebranding Reno

The self-styled Biggest Little City in the World bets on a high-tech jackpot.

The Big Owe

Like other hastily built global sports venues, Brazil's dozen new World Cup stadiums may prove to be a bad investment.

Can Solar Gardens Grow Jobs?

Massachusetts joins the states permitting regional solar-array utilities.

Fukushima: Year Three

The mega-disaster that won't go away isn't getting any better.

Giving and Getting

A report on one state's use of huge tax credits to lure or retain businesses provokes some thoughts on diminishing returns.

All the Way Back

The United States finally has recovered all of the jobs we lost in the Great Recession.

First-Class Visas

Austin, TX is thinking of setting up an immigrant investor program: Fund a project, get a visa.

Turbocharging Motown’s Recovery

JPMorgan Chase commits $100 million to help rebuild Detroit.

Orient Express

As Russia starts to sever its connections with the U.S., China plans a bold high-tech bridge between East and West.

The Reckoning

Memo to climate change deniers: You're gonna need a bigger boat.

For Whom the Road Tolls

Say goodbye to your free ride on the nation's physical and digital superhighways.

Molecular Miracle

As flexible as rubber, thinner than a human hair and 200 times stronger than steel, graphene is about to change the world.

Battle for North America

Germany's auto giants are set to unleash billions of dollars to expand North American production.

Dealing from the Bottom of the Deck

Old-school automakers are circling their dealership wagons in a last line of defense against Tesla.

Tidal Wave of the Future

If a hydrokinetic pilot project in the East River is successful, the lights will come on in NYC when the tide comes in.

Hacking and Hijacking

It may be time to rethink the rush towards in-flight Internet service for airline passengers.

Reefer Madness

Ready or not, legalized marijuana is shaping up to become a leading growth sector in the U.S.

Bootstraps for Building

Allentown, PA revitalizes an aging city center by offering developers a unique way to offset construction costs.

Public or Private?

Should transparency and economic development be synonymous? The debate continues.

Seismic Side Effects

It's getting harder to dismiss a connection between fracking and a recent outbreak of earthquakes near drilling operations.

Isthmus Interruptus

The world’s most important development project—the expansion of the Panama Canal—may not be completed for another two years.

Take a Break, Noah

California is facing the worst drought in its history, a 500-year shortfall of biblical proportions.

Spanning the Hudson

In 2016, a snazzy new bridge will begin absorbing the overflow from any traffic jams on the GWB.

Call to the Bullpen

Rhode Island readies a new economic development pitch as it cleans up the mess left by the Curt Schilling fiasco.

Riding the Wind

Expanded federal subsidies spurred a bevy of year-end wind power project announcements, including a $1.9-billion deal in Iowa.

The Drone Age

A new era dawns as the FAA clears six drone test sites for takeoff in the U.S.

Losing the Broadband Race

We invented the Internet, but even Romania and Moldova are blowing the doors off the U.S. in high-speed broadband.

Crystal Ball 2014

BF doesn't need NSA's help to eavesdrop on the future--we've got a direct connection to next year's headlines!

Deal of the Decade

States from coast to coast have put in mega-bids to try to land Boeing's 777X assembly line.

Grounded

As Amazon aims to fill our skies with mini-drones, the Supreme Court brings it down to Earth on sales tax collections.

Blue Thursday

It probably will take a federal law to prevent big retailers from ruining Thanksgiving.

With a Wave and a Smile, He’s Gone

America says its final goodbye to President Kennedy on the 50th anniversary of his death.

Stadium Arcadium

The Atlanta Braves write another chapter in the long-running saga of publicly financed sports palaces.

Team USA Goes for Gold

SelectUSA kicks off a full-court press to lure $1 trillion in foreign direct investment to the United States.

One Year Later

The report cards are in for the Superstorm Sandy recovery and the grade is "incomplete" as misery continues for thousands who have lost their homes or businesses.

European Union Avoids Fracturing

The EU's financial union may be cracking, but our friends overseas seem to be uniting over one thing: they don't like fracking.

“Mitbestimmung” in Tennessee

Volkswagen seeks the middle ground as the UAW targets the German automaker's assembly plant in a right-to-work state.

Hurricane Hazel

Hazel McCallion, mayor of Canada's sixth-largest city, is still going strong at the age of 92.

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Location Spotlight: Topeka, Kansas

With three top universities in the area and connectivity via major interstates, Topeka, Kansas is rich with opportunity. Visit the GO Topeka Economic Partnership to learn more.

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