Magazine Archives

Mississippi Corporate Moves

Mississippi Corporate Moves

Advanced Manufacturing Flocks to Mississippi Mississippi is becoming a magnet for companies specializing in advanced manufacturing techniques that also are seeking centralized logistics operations. With low taxes and a low cost of doing business, the state also is an attractive choice for companies looking for ways to reduce operational costs. In April, G & G Steel, producer of some of the world’s largest fabricated metal components, announced plans for a metal fabrication facility to be located in the Tri-State Commerce Park in Iuka, MS. The company will fabricate metal components for large-scale projects including bridges, locks and mining equipment at its new facility. The area’s available workforce and access to major transportation networks were key factors in the decision to locate in Mississippi. Earlier this year, Handy Hardware, a member-owned hardware-buying group, announced the location of a distribution center in the Meridian I-20/59 Industrial Park. Handy plans to break ground on its new facility by the middle of this year. Once complete, the distribution center is expected to create more than 150 new jobs, representing a $20-million investment by the company. Other companies are expanding operations already located in Mississippi: Alliant Techsystems (ATK), is making preparations to manufacture composite structures for commercial aircraft applications at its Iuka, MS, facility. The company will produce composite stringers and frames, which are essential components of next-generation commercial aircrafts. The expansion is expected to retain 176 current jobs and increase the workforce to a total of 800 employees over the next eight years. Nissan North America, which has been manufacturing automobiles in Mississippi since 2003, currently is expanding its Canton, MS, plant as the company prepares to launch commercial vehicles (CV) in 2010. The facility will produce the NV2500 Concept, which is Nissan’s first entry into the CV market in North America. The expansion represents a $118-million investment by Nissan North America. Mississippi also is home to a number of leading research centers dedicated to telecommunications, geospatial systems, aerospace and aviation, biotechnology and biodefense, polymers and more. From the University of Southern Mississippi’s Polymer Institute to Mississippi State University’s Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems, the state’s universities and colleges are forming innovative partnerships with companies to provide the technology resources companies need to develop new products and new manufacturing capabilities. Tylertown Site Shines for Kalencom Kalencom, Inc. recently selected the former MultiCraft facility in Tylertown, MS to manufacture soft-good jewelry packaging and specialty-sewn products. Kalencom is a multi-faceted manufacturer made up of four divisions. The company’s marketing distribution concentrates in the U.S., Canada, Caribbean, […]



60 Seconds with Alex Brigham, Executive Director, Ethisphere Institute

60 Seconds with Alex Brigham, Executive Director, Ethisphere Institute

BF: What factors or qualities are considered paramount for the Ethisphere Institute to designate a company as ethical? AB: More than 70 criteria make up a company’s Ethics Quotient score. Critical factors include: 1. How robust is the corporate compliance and ethics program? Examples include the quality of its code of ethics and related     ethics training and communication; effectiveness reporting and whistleblower systems; and tone from the top. 2. Environmental impact, where criteria may vary by industry; sustainability initiatives, reporting and transparency. 3. Industry leadership in ethics, citizenship and responsibility; we are looking for standard setters and early adopters versus     followers. 4. Clean legal history, or in case of past violations, evidence of adequate response and significant efforts made to avoid future     infractions. BF: Do any specific industries have large numbers of ethical companies? AB: Consumer products and food industries traditionally have been topping the charts for corporate ethics and citizenship, perhaps due to consumer and peer- pressure factors. Some companies were on the forefront of responsible business long before it became an accepted practice. For example, Kellogg’s pioneered recycled packaging in 1906. The technology sector, including computer and electronics manufacturers, software developers, Internet and telecom companies, also is noteworthy for a large number of ethical companies. Many of them are relatively young companies, whose cultures have been shaped or influenced by their founders, many of whom are known supporters of responsible business practices. BF: How can a company with a tight budget improve its ethical standing? AB: Companies should treat spending on ethics as investments into brand equity versus cost to be cut. Many pragmatic steps can be taken without breaking the bank. The cost of creating a best practice code of ethics and related training and communication program is miniscule compared to what some companies spend on brand advertising. While publishing glossy citizenship reports can be expensive, some of them really disappoint by the lack of hard facts. Greater transparency and disclosure don’t really require extra budgets; they require an executive will. Likewise, strong tone from the top needs engaged, visible and committed executives. Finally, walk the talk. World’s Most Ethical Companies The Ethisphere Institute, a think tank dedicated to the best practices in business ethics, recently announced a list of the World’s Most Ethical Companies. Entries came from more than 100 countries and 35 industries, and 99 companies made the final cut. A sample of honorees from the United States include: Honeywell International, The Aerospace Corporation, Nike, Patagonia, Dell, Hewlett-Packard, Xerox, Oracle Corporation, Symantec, Mattel, General Electric, […]








Michigan is Still in Motion

Michigan is Still in Motion

The automotive industry may have hit a stop sign, but Gov. Jennifer Granholm’s aggressive strategy is maintaining forward momentum in the crown of the Great Lakes. From motion pictures to nanotechnology, the Wolverine State is in the hunt for new jobs.