Magazine | Business Facilities - Economic Development, Site Selection & Workforce Solutions

The America China Society of Indiana (ACSI) was recently formed as the trade organization that will promote cooperative business, trade and investment opportunities between the Hoosier State and the world’s most populous nation. The effort is headed by ACSI chairman Albert Chen, president and founder of Telamon. BF: How long has Telamon been involved in business ventures on mainland China? Do you have facilities in China? AC: Our firm has been in China since 1986. We operate three facilities there that repair and test wireless devices. We also are involved in IT software development in China and South Korea. BF: The announcement for the new trade initiative indicated that Indiana will be promoting agricultural products, advanced bioscience, automotive and IT technology for export to China. Do you expect this to be a two-way street, resulting in new jobs in Indiana? AC: The focus will be on both jobs and the exchange of goods. We are interested in selling Indiana’s products in China, which will create jobs here. We also want to help China understand the investment opportunity for Chinese firms here in Indiana. We aim to promote cooperative business, trade and investment opportunities between Indiana and China. BF: China has a huge, low-cost labor pool and a growing domestic market. Can U.S. producers compete with Chinese manufacturers in their home market? AC: Our exports to China will help meet the tremendous demand of the Chinese market. We also want to convince China that it can make a wise investment in Indiana in producing consumer goods here as well as industrial parts. BF: What will be one of the key attractions for Chinese businesses that may want to set up shop in Indiana? AC: Indiana is the Crossroads of America. We can offer tremendous logistics advantages for anyone locating their business in Indiana. BF: Currently, the U.S. balance of trade with China is widely skewed in China’s favor. Can this trend be reversed? AC: Sometimes these figures can be misleading. For example, custom touchscreen phone components that cost $178 to produce in the U.S. cost $6 to produce in China, but the value of the goods is usually stated based on the U.S. cost. BF: Many businesses like yours have forged their own ties with China. Why is a statewide trade organization needed? AC: A lot of small- to medium-sized businesses don’t have enough experience in dealing with China. We want to share our experience with them. BF: It took about 20 years to establish a significant number of Japanese business […]


The America China Society of Indiana (ACSI) was recently formed as the trade organization that will promote cooperative business, trade and investment opportunities between the Hoosier State and the world’s most populous nation. The effort is headed by ACSI chairman Albert Chen, president and founder of Telamon. BF: How long has Telamon been involved in business ventures on mainland China? Do you have facilities in China? AC: Our firm has been in China since 1986. We operate three facilities there that repair and test wireless devices. We also are involved in IT software development in China and South Korea. BF: The announcement for the new trade initiative indicated that Indiana will be promoting agricultural products, advanced bioscience, automotive and IT technology for export to China. Do you expect this to be a two-way street, resulting in new jobs in Indiana? AC: The focus will be on both jobs and the exchange of goods. We are interested in selling Indiana’s products in China, which will create jobs here. We also want to help China understand the investment opportunity for Chinese firms here in Indiana. We aim to promote cooperative business, trade and investment opportunities between Indiana and China. BF: China has a huge, low-cost labor pool and a growing domestic market. Can U.S. producers compete with Chinese manufacturers in their home market? AC: Our exports to China will help meet the tremendous demand of the Chinese market. We also want to convince China that it can make a wise investment in Indiana in producing consumer goods here as well as industrial parts. BF: What will be one of the key attractions for Chinese businesses that may want to set up shop in Indiana? AC: Indiana is the Crossroads of America. We can offer tremendous logistics advantages for anyone locating their business in Indiana. BF: Currently, the U.S. balance of trade with China is widely skewed in China’s favor. Can this trend be reversed? AC: Sometimes these figures can be misleading. For example, custom touchscreen phone components that cost $178 to produce in the U.S. cost $6 to produce in China, but the value of the goods is usually stated based on the U.S. cost. BF: Many businesses like yours have forged their own ties with China. Why is a statewide trade organization needed? AC: A lot of small- to medium-sized businesses don’t have enough experience in dealing with China. We want to share our experience with them. BF: It took about 20 years to establish a significant number of Japanese business […]

60 Seconds with Albert Chen, Chairman of the America China Society of Indiana

Magazine Articles

60 Seconds with Albert Chen, Chairman of the America China Society of Indiana

60 Seconds with Albert Chen, Chairman of the America China Society of Indiana

The America China Society of Indiana (ACSI) was recently formed as the trade organization that will promote cooperative business, trade and investment opportunities between the Hoosier State and the world’s most populous nation. The effort is headed by ACSI chairman Albert Chen, president and founder of Telamon. BF: How long has Telamon been involved in business ventures on mainland China? Do you have facilities in China? AC: Our firm has been in China since 1986. We operate three facilities there that repair and test wireless devices. We also are involved in IT software development in China and South Korea. BF: The announcement for the new trade initiative indicated that Indiana will be promoting agricultural products, advanced bioscience, automotive and IT technology for export to China. Do you expect this to be a two-way street, resulting in new jobs in Indiana? AC: The focus will be on both jobs and the exchange of goods. We are interested in selling Indiana’s products in China, which will create jobs here. We also want to help China understand the investment opportunity for Chinese firms here in Indiana. We aim to promote cooperative business, trade and investment opportunities between Indiana and China. BF: China has a huge, low-cost labor pool and a growing domestic market. Can U.S. producers compete with Chinese manufacturers in their home market? AC: Our exports to China will help meet the tremendous demand of the Chinese market. We also want to convince China that it can make a wise investment in Indiana in producing consumer goods here as well as industrial parts. BF: What will be one of the key attractions for Chinese businesses that may want to set up shop in Indiana? AC: Indiana is the Crossroads of America. We can offer tremendous logistics advantages for anyone locating their business in Indiana. BF: Currently, the U.S. balance of trade with China is widely skewed in China’s favor. Can this trend be reversed? AC: Sometimes these figures can be misleading. For example, custom touchscreen phone components that cost $178 to produce in the U.S. cost $6 to produce in China, but the value of the goods is usually stated based on the U.S. cost. BF: Many businesses like yours have forged their own ties with China. Why is a statewide trade organization needed? AC: A lot of small- to medium-sized businesses don’t have enough experience in dealing with China. We want to share our experience with them. BF: It took about 20 years to establish a significant number of Japanese business […]


FEATURE STORY: Building Inspiration – Over The Years And Into The Future

In 1994, the Asbury Park Press profiled Group C in a feature headlined “Trade Publisher Survives The Lean Years.” The photo that accompanied the profile shows Ed, seated, at work with Susan and Ted Coene.

In its 40-year history, entrepreneurship and innovation have been the hallmark of Group C’s emergence as a full-service provider to the site selection community. Ed Coene’s original formula for success still guides the development of a dynamic brand with international reach in print, online and unique events that are essential components of successful project development. From the November/December 2010 issue.