Business Facilities Staff

International credit information firm Experian plans to increase the size of its Allen, TX operation by almost a third, according to a report in the Dallas Morning News. Experian signed a deal this week with the city of Allen to expand its operations by 300 people in exchange for increased economic incentives, the Allen Economic Development Corp. said. Experian plans additional business operations at its 300,000-square-foot complex in Allen’s Enterprise Business Park. About 600 Experian workers are housed in the facility, east of U.S. Highway 75. Experian has had operations in Allen since 1993 and is the Collin County city’s largest employer. The company has facilities in Allen for several business groups, including its National Consumer Assistance Center and its Decision Analytics, Information Technology and Public Education groups. In 2008, Experian renewed its lease at the Enterprise Business Park for 10 years, according to Robert R. Winningham, Allen Economic Development CEO. The new agreement calls for Allen to provide funds to remodel and build new offices in the Enterprise Business Park building that Experian will use. Winningham said the value of the incentive depends on how much growth the company has. It could be as much as $1.5 million paid over 10 years. But to receive all the incentive funds for the building renovation, Experian would have to invest $30 million. “Experian’s positive relationship with the city has influenced our decision to move additional business here,” said Carlos Medina, senior vice president of global operations.


International credit information firm Experian plans to increase the size of its Allen, TX operation by almost a third, according to a report in the Dallas Morning News. Experian signed a deal this week with the city of Allen to expand its operations by 300 people in exchange for increased economic incentives, the Allen Economic Development Corp. said. Experian plans additional business operations at its 300,000-square-foot complex in Allen’s Enterprise Business Park. About 600 Experian workers are housed in the facility, east of U.S. Highway 75. Experian has had operations in Allen since 1993 and is the Collin County city’s largest employer. The company has facilities in Allen for several business groups, including its National Consumer Assistance Center and its Decision Analytics, Information Technology and Public Education groups. In 2008, Experian renewed its lease at the Enterprise Business Park for 10 years, according to Robert R. Winningham, Allen Economic Development CEO. The new agreement calls for Allen to provide funds to remodel and build new offices in the Enterprise Business Park building that Experian will use. Winningham said the value of the incentive depends on how much growth the company has. It could be as much as $1.5 million paid over 10 years. But to receive all the incentive funds for the building renovation, Experian would have to invest $30 million. “Experian’s positive relationship with the city has influenced our decision to move additional business here,” said Carlos Medina, senior vice president of global operations.

Experian Adding 300 Jobs in Allen, TX

BF Staff

Experian Adding 300 Jobs in Allen, TX

Experian Adding 300 Jobs in Allen, TX

International credit information firm Experian plans to increase the size of its Allen, TX operation by almost a third, according to a report in the Dallas Morning News. Experian signed a deal this week with the city of Allen to expand its operations by 300 people in exchange for increased economic incentives, the Allen Economic Development Corp. said. Experian plans additional business operations at its 300,000-square-foot complex in Allen’s Enterprise Business Park. About 600 Experian workers are housed in the facility, east of U.S. Highway 75. Experian has had operations in Allen since 1993 and is the Collin County city’s largest employer. The company has facilities in Allen for several business groups, including its National Consumer Assistance Center and its Decision Analytics, Information Technology and Public Education groups. In 2008, Experian renewed its lease at the Enterprise Business Park for 10 years, according to Robert R. Winningham, Allen Economic Development CEO. The new agreement calls for Allen to provide funds to remodel and build new offices in the Enterprise Business Park building that Experian will use. Winningham said the value of the incentive depends on how much growth the company has. It could be as much as $1.5 million paid over 10 years. But to receive all the incentive funds for the building renovation, Experian would have to invest $30 million. “Experian’s positive relationship with the city has influenced our decision to move additional business here,” said Carlos Medina, senior vice president of global operations.



OK Governor Urges Funding for EDGE

OK Governor Urges Funding for EDGE

Gov. Brad Henry is asking state lawmakers to develop a permanent funding source for a planned $1 billion endowment to help fund research projects in Oklahoma. Henry last week urged the Legislature to dedicate a revenue stream for the Economic Development Generating Excellence, or EDGE, fund. The Legislature voted to create the endowment in 2004, but only $150 million has been deposited so far. Interest from the fund is used to pay for research projects that attract capital and high paying jobs to the state. Henry previously has suggested setting aside a portion of state investment earnings, gross production receipts or reserve fund interest earnings. Under his latest plan, designated funding would not begin flowing to the endowment until the state’s budget crisis is over.


Where The Grass is Getting Greener

State approval of the use of marijuana for reducing nausea in chemotherapy patients and other medical applications is spreading like, well, marijuana. Fourteen states now have approved the possession of up to six ounces of pot for medical purposes, the latest being New Jersey, which passed a medical marijuana bill early last month that was signed into law by outgoing Gov. Jon Corzine. Numerous other states have medical marijuana bills pending. California, the first state to legalize medical marijuana in 1996, has seen an explosion of marijuana “clinics” in recent years, hundreds of outlets that dispense weed for everything from cancer treatment to “stress” as long as a doctor is willing to write a prescription. With the nation’s largest state teetering on the brink of fiscal collapse, a growing movement in California has been promoting outright legalization or at least taxation of the state’s burgeoning pot crop as a means of generating revenue. Unofficial estimates suggest that marijuana is the largest harvested crop in the Golden State. Much bigger than broccoli without a doubt. So perhaps it is only inevitable that the focus of the medical marijuana debate is shifting from the virtues of using the plant for medical purposes to the economic potency of weed as a cash crop. This is the case in Colorado, which legalized medical marijuana in 2000. State legislators are now grappling with the issues surrounding the state’s growing number of marijuana delivery outlets. This prompted one Denver city councilwoman, Carol Boignon, to write an op-ed column in the Colorado Statesman warning about the dangers of treating pot as an economic development tool. Here are Ms. Boignon’s comments: “More than 400 medical marijuana dispensaries have applied for use permits in Denver, most of them in the last two and a half months. Constituents on all sides of the issue have contacted me: patients depending on marijuana to ease their illnesses, caregivers seeking to provide a service, and deeply concerned residents trying to protect their neighborhoods from crime and their children from harm. How did Denver get here? A little history: In 2000, Colorado voters authorized the use of medical marijuana for adults suffering from certain illnesses, including cancer, and for pain. Denver voters were strong supporters of the initiative. In 2007, Denver voters by 57 percent to 43 percent authorized the City to make enforcement of possession of less than 1 ounce of marijuana a low priority, despite federal laws making possession a felony. In 2007, Denver District Judge Larry Naves ruled that the state […]