October 2010 | Page 3 of 4 | Business Facilities - Economic Development, Site Selection & Workforce Solutions

Perpetual Recycling Solutions has chosen Richmond, Indiana as the site of its next plant, bringing a $25 million investment and 55 new jobs to the city by the start of 2012. The Chicago-based plastics recycling company is purchasing the former Amcast and General Aluminum manufacturing building at 1561 N.W. 11th St and plans a 20,000-square-foot addition to the 100,000-square-foot building. Kevin Ahaus, Economic Development Corporation (EDC) board chairman, said Richmond competed with sites in Missouri and Iowa and another site in Indiana for the project. The EDC of Wayne County approved a $350,000 grant that will go to the Wayne County Commissioners for final consideration today. Richmond Mayor Sally Hutton has also committed $125,000 in EDIT funds to the plant. In addition, the deal to bring Perpetual Recycling Solutions to Richmond is contingent upon RP&L granting the company about 15 acres; RP&L owns the land and prepared it for development years ago. Perpetual Recycling Solutions will also ask the Richmond Common Council to approve a 10-year tax abatement on new machinery, equipment and real estate improvements and will ask council to serve as a conduit for $25 million in bonds related to the tax-exempt Heartland Disaster Relief Act of 2008. EDC president Tim Rogers said Perpetual Recycling Solutions will have an annual payroll of $2 million with an average wage of $18 per hour. He said some workers will come to Richmond from Chicago but that the vast majority would be hired locally. Rogers also said the company will be a large electric consumer, purchasing close to $1 million in electricity from Richmond Power & Light each year. When completed, the Perpetual Recycling Solutions plant will be capable of converting more than 130 million pounds of plastic food and beverage containers—the equivalent of 1 billion plastic bottles—into plastic flake and resin pellets used to make other plastic containers.


Perpetual Recycling Solutions has chosen Richmond, Indiana as the site of its next plant, bringing a $25 million investment and 55 new jobs to the city by the start of 2012. The Chicago-based plastics recycling company is purchasing the former Amcast and General Aluminum manufacturing building at 1561 N.W. 11th St and plans a 20,000-square-foot addition to the 100,000-square-foot building. Kevin Ahaus, Economic Development Corporation (EDC) board chairman, said Richmond competed with sites in Missouri and Iowa and another site in Indiana for the project. The EDC of Wayne County approved a $350,000 grant that will go to the Wayne County Commissioners for final consideration today. Richmond Mayor Sally Hutton has also committed $125,000 in EDIT funds to the plant. In addition, the deal to bring Perpetual Recycling Solutions to Richmond is contingent upon RP&L granting the company about 15 acres; RP&L owns the land and prepared it for development years ago. Perpetual Recycling Solutions will also ask the Richmond Common Council to approve a 10-year tax abatement on new machinery, equipment and real estate improvements and will ask council to serve as a conduit for $25 million in bonds related to the tax-exempt Heartland Disaster Relief Act of 2008. EDC president Tim Rogers said Perpetual Recycling Solutions will have an annual payroll of $2 million with an average wage of $18 per hour. He said some workers will come to Richmond from Chicago but that the vast majority would be hired locally. Rogers also said the company will be a large electric consumer, purchasing close to $1 million in electricity from Richmond Power & Light each year. When completed, the Perpetual Recycling Solutions plant will be capable of converting more than 130 million pounds of plastic food and beverage containers—the equivalent of 1 billion plastic bottles—into plastic flake and resin pellets used to make other plastic containers.

New Project Means “Green” for Indiana

5 years ago

New Project Means “Green” for Indiana

New Project Means “Green” for Indiana

Perpetual Recycling Solutions has chosen Richmond, Indiana as the site of its next plant, bringing a $25 million investment and 55 new jobs to the city by the start of 2012. The Chicago-based plastics recycling company is purchasing the former Amcast and General Aluminum manufacturing building at 1561 N.W. 11th St and plans a 20,000-square-foot addition to the 100,000-square-foot building. Kevin Ahaus, Economic Development Corporation (EDC) board chairman, said Richmond competed with sites in Missouri and Iowa and another site in Indiana for the project. The EDC of Wayne County approved a $350,000 grant that will go to the Wayne County Commissioners for final consideration today. Richmond Mayor Sally Hutton has also committed $125,000 in EDIT funds to the plant. In addition, the deal to bring Perpetual Recycling Solutions to Richmond is contingent upon RP&L granting the company about 15 acres; RP&L owns the land and prepared it for development years ago. Perpetual Recycling Solutions will also ask the Richmond Common Council to approve a 10-year tax abatement on new machinery, equipment and real estate improvements and will ask council to serve as a conduit for $25 million in bonds related to the tax-exempt Heartland Disaster Relief Act of 2008. EDC president Tim Rogers said Perpetual Recycling Solutions will have an annual payroll of $2 million with an average wage of $18 per hour. He said some workers will come to Richmond from Chicago but that the vast majority would be hired locally. Rogers also said the company will be a large electric consumer, purchasing close to $1 million in electricity from Richmond Power & Light each year. When completed, the Perpetual Recycling Solutions plant will be capable of converting more than 130 million pounds of plastic food and beverage containers—the equivalent of 1 billion plastic bottles—into plastic flake and resin pellets used to make other plastic containers.


$17 Million Plant Coming to Rankin County

$17 Million Plant Coming to Rankin County

The Scotts Miracle-Gro Company, an industry leading lawn and garden supplies manufacturer, will invest approximately $17 million to open a plant in Pearl, MS. The 292,000-square foot Gulf Line Road facility will create 95 full-time and 50 seasonal jobs. Expected to open in January 2011, the 64-acre site—formerly owned by Clorox Company—will produce lawn and garden products, including Scotts, Ortho and Roundup. The Mississippi Development Authority (MDA) and Rankin County worked closely with Scotts Miracle-Gro and local officials to help facilitate the project and provided assistance through the Jobs Tax Credit program and other tax incentives. Tom Troxler, Executive Director of Rankin First Economic Development Authority, said the county and city of Pearl courted Columbus, Ohio-based Scotts for a long time. Both local governments tossed in 10-year tax exemptions and the MDA added funding for training. “The support of state and local leaders played a critical role in our decision to come to Pearl,” said Scotts Senior Vice President of Global Supply Chain Dave Swihart. “We are very excited to come to Pearl and to the Greater Jackson area…locating production closer to where our products are consumed will help us maximize transportation efficiencies for both raw materials and finished product and will let us respond rapidly to customer and consumer needs.”


Med Device Maker Expands in Clayton

Med Device Maker Expands in Clayton

Novo Nordisk, a global healthcare company and leader in diabetes care, today announced a $73 million expansion of its Clayton, NC manufacturing facility to accommodate increased production capacity for the company’s insulin delivery devices. The initial expansion will create 205 new jobs, including 85 in the Novo Nordisk Clayton facility, which currently produces a number of products, including the Levemir® FlexPen® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) and other products for the entire diabetes portfolio. Novo Nordisk currently has more than 420 employees in Clayton who oversee the full production process for six different diabetes treatment products, from formulation through packaging and distribution. The expansion will include the addition of two final assembly lines, two packing lines and building refurbishment. “The investment to expand our Clayton facility is another example of our commitment to improving diabetes treatment options in the U.S. by ensuring patients have access to the latest advances in treatment,” said Jerzy Gruhn, president of Novo Nordisk Inc. “Insulin delivery devices give people with diabetes a convenient way to manage their health and engage in a productive lifestyle. As patients in the U.S. continue to move from administering insulin with a conventional vial and syringe to using a pen device, Novo Nordisk will be prepared to meet growing market demand.” Novo Nordisk, which created the first insulin pen device in 1985, is a world leader in producing and delivering innovative insulin delivery systems. The company has been working with physicians and patients to demonstrate the many benefits of modern delivery devices over vials and syringes, including adherence, ease of use and dosing accuracy. Since their launch 25 years ago, devices have become the dominant form of insulin delivery in most markets outside the U.S. and are gaining share domestically. Novo Nordisk selected the Clayton site for expansion after an evaluation of both domestic and international facilities. Cost and productivity factors, including the levels of incentive support from local and state resources, were taken into consideration. The Clayton expansion project is approved to receive incentive support from a Job Development Investment Grant and a One North Carolina Fund grant.  The company’s final decision is contingent upon final approval of local government incentives by Johnston County and Buncombe County.