Where the pain is (and isn’t)

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A state-by-state breakdown of unemployment, budget deficit and foreclosure statistics, jointly produced by CNN, Fortune and Money magazines, clearly illustrates which states are getting hit the hardest by the recession.

Here are the states that appear to be in the worst shape, economically, according to an aggregate of these indicators:

California — 8.4 percent unemployment, $14 billion deficit, 3.9 percent of homes in foreclosure

Florida –7.3 percent unemployment, $2.3 billion deficit, 7.3 percent of homes in foreclosure

Michigan — 9.6 percent unemployment, $145 million deficit, 3.5 percent of homes in foreclosure

Georgia — 7.5 percent unemployment, $2.5 billion deficit, 2.3 percent of homes in foreclosure

Nevada — 8 percent unemployment, $536 million deficit, 5.9 percent of homes in foreclosure

Illinois — 7.3 percent unemployment, $2 billion deficit, 3.5 percent of homes in foreclosure

Arizona — 6.3 percent unemployment, $1.2 billion deficit, 3.9 percent of homes in foreclosure

Ohio — 7.3 percent unemployment, $1.2 billion deficit, 3.4 percent of homes in foreclosure
Those on the brighter side (below the national average in negatives) of the economic ledger include:

Nebraska — 3.7 percent unemployment, no deficit, 1.6 percent of homes in foreclosure

North Dakota — 3.3 percent unemployment, no deficit, 0.9 percent of homes in foreclosure

Wyoming — 3.2 percent unemployment, no deficit, 0.6 percent of homes in foreclosure

Montana — 4.9 percent unemployment, no deficit, 0.6 percent of homes in foreclosure

Texas — 5.3 percent unemployment, no deficit, 1.43 homes in foreclosure

The full state-by-state breakdown can be viewed at
http://money.cnn.com/news/storysupplement/economy/gapmap/index.htm.

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A state-by-state breakdown of unemployment, budget deficit and foreclosure statistics, jointly produced by CNN, Fortune and Money magazines, clearly illustrates which states are getting hit the hardest by the recession. Here are the states that appear to be in the worst shape, economically, according to an aggregate of these indicators: California — 8.4 percent unemployment, $14 billion deficit, 3.9 percent of homes in foreclosure Florida –7.3 percent unemployment, $2.3 billion deficit, 7.3 percent of homes in foreclosure Michigan — 9.6 percent unemployment, $145 million deficit, 3.5 percent of homes in foreclosure Georgia — 7.5 percent unemployment, $2.5 billion deficit, 2.3 percent of homes in foreclosure Nevada — 8 percent unemployment, $536 million deficit, 5.9 percent of homes in foreclosure Illinois — 7.3 percent unemployment, $2 billion deficit, 3.5 percent of homes in foreclosure Arizona — 6.3 percent unemployment, $1.2 billion deficit, 3.9 percent of homes in foreclosure Ohio — 7.3 percent unemployment, $1.2 billion deficit, 3.4 percent of homes in foreclosure Those on the brighter side (below the national average in negatives) of the economic ledger include: Nebraska — 3.7 percent unemployment, no deficit, 1.6 percent of homes in foreclosure North Dakota — 3.3 percent unemployment, no deficit, 0.9 percent of homes in foreclosure Wyoming — 3.2 percent unemployment, no deficit, 0.6 percent of homes in foreclosure Montana — 4.9 percent unemployment, no deficit, 0.6 percent of homes in foreclosure Texas — 5.3 percent unemployment, no deficit, 1.43 homes in foreclosure The full state-by-state breakdown can be viewed at http://money.cnn.com/news/storysupplement/economy/gapmap/index.htm. Related PostsState Focus: Industry Is Not The Only Thing Buzzing In UtahManufacturers Remain Optimistic Despite Growing Concerns Around Strong U.S. DollarBusiness Facilities’ 2015 State Rankings Report: Nebraska Tops Employment Leaders FieldUSDA Awards Loans And Grants To Support Rural Economic Development
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