2008 | Page 24 of 24 | Business Facilities - Economic Development, Site Selection & Workforce Solutions

Recently, “green” has become the ubiquitous buzzword used to describe all things environmentally-friendly. But prior to such days of mainstream climate-consciousness, the word “green” often summoned images of the US dollar which, of course, has taken a dramatic dip in value over the last several years, most notably against the British pound, the euro, and, now, the Canadian dollar. Fortunately, yesterday’s edition of The New York Times included an article predicting that the worst is over and that 2008 will see the dollar get its groove back. This is hopeful news for investors, and the article offers some expert advice as to what stocks and markets we should put our resurgent greenbacks into. It’s also great news for globetrotters who felt the sting of foreign price tags last year. I had a busy personal travel calendar in 2007 and, after a pricey jaunt to New Zealand and French Polynesia in February, and a two-month summer stay in Wales and England, where the dollar was crippled, I finally learned my lesson when choosing a New Year’s Eve destination: Guatemala. The dollar still has buying power in some places! Let’s hope this list expands in 2008.


Recently, “green” has become the ubiquitous buzzword used to describe all things environmentally-friendly. But prior to such days of mainstream climate-consciousness, the word “green” often summoned images of the US dollar which, of course, has taken a dramatic dip in value over the last several years, most notably against the British pound, the euro, and, now, the Canadian dollar. Fortunately, yesterday’s edition of The New York Times included an article predicting that the worst is over and that 2008 will see the dollar get its groove back. This is hopeful news for investors, and the article offers some expert advice as to what stocks and markets we should put our resurgent greenbacks into. It’s also great news for globetrotters who felt the sting of foreign price tags last year. I had a busy personal travel calendar in 2007 and, after a pricey jaunt to New Zealand and French Polynesia in February, and a two-month summer stay in Wales and England, where the dollar was crippled, I finally learned my lesson when choosing a New Year’s Eve destination: Guatemala. The dollar still has buying power in some places! Let’s hope this list expands in 2008.

America’s Great Green Hope

8 years ago

America’s Great Green Hope

America’s Great Green Hope

Recently, “green” has become the ubiquitous buzzword used to describe all things environmentally-friendly. But prior to such days of mainstream climate-consciousness, the word “green” often summoned images of the US dollar which, of course, has taken a dramatic dip in value over the last several years, most notably against the British pound, the euro, and, now, the Canadian dollar. Fortunately, yesterday’s edition of The New York Times included an article predicting that the worst is over and that 2008 will see the dollar get its groove back. This is hopeful news for investors, and the article offers some expert advice as to what stocks and markets we should put our resurgent greenbacks into. It’s also great news for globetrotters who felt the sting of foreign price tags last year. I had a busy personal travel calendar in 2007 and, after a pricey jaunt to New Zealand and French Polynesia in February, and a two-month summer stay in Wales and England, where the dollar was crippled, I finally learned my lesson when choosing a New Year’s Eve destination: Guatemala. The dollar still has buying power in some places! Let’s hope this list expands in 2008.


Competitive Trade Logistics Critical for Developing Countries

Competitive Trade Logistics Critical for Developing Countries

I came across an interesting article today in the Latin Business Chronicle that talked about a recent report that came out from the World Bank entitled “Connecting to Compete: Trade Logistics in the Global Economy.” According to the report, countries in Latin America and the Caribbean ranked way behind several developing countries, especially in Asia, in trade logistics competitiveness. For developing countries, the ability to connect to international markets to ship goods is a key way to increase competitiveness in the global economy. The full report and related information are available here.


Economic Marks of the New Year

Economic Marks of the New Year

You surely have been inundated with this news story, which is essentially contained within its own headline Oil breaks $100 as U.S. stockpiles drop   Did you catch this one, though? Toyota Ousts Ford From No. 2 Spot in U.S. Sales It’s not like we didn’t know either one of these was coming—and these aren’t really necessarily bad things, in the long term. But I think we may find that, presidential caucuses and primaries aside, it will set the tone for 2008.